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Abstract Detail



Pteridological Section/AFS

Matos, Fernando [1], Moran, Robbin [1].

Systematic studies of Elaphoglossum section Polytrichia (Dryopteridaceae).

With more than 600 species worldwide, Elaphoglossum (Dryopteridaceae) is one of the largest genera of ferns. To make it more manageable taxonomically, several authors have attempted to divide the genus into smaller clades. It is now generally agreed that the species of Elaphoglossum with subulate scales (i.e., scales that are enrolled lengthwise) and without hydathodes on their mature leaves form a monophyletic group. This group has been referred to as section Polytrichia and comprises ca. 60 species. All the species are neotropical except for E. hybridum, which also occurs in Africa, Madagascar, and islands of the mid-Atlantic and Indian Oceans. The delimitations of several species and relationships within this clade are far from clear. Therefore, the main goal of our research is to provide a well-supported phylogenetic hypothesis for Elaphoglossum sect. Polytrichia, founded on both morphological and molecular data, from which morphologically recognizable subclades can be identified for subsequent monographic study. So far, our molecular analyses using three chloroplast markers (atpB-rbcL, rps4-trnS, and trnL-F) have corroborated the monophyly of the section and recovered several smaller monophyletic groups. One of these groups is defined morphologically by the presence of flat, non-subulate scales on the lamina margins and will be the focus of a monographic study.

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1 - The New York Botanical Garden, Institute of Systematic Botany, 2900 Southern Blvd., Bronx, NY, 10458, USA

Keywords:
Elaphoglossum
ferns
Neotropics
Taxonomy.

Presentation Type: Oral Paper:Papers for Sections
Session: 34
Location: Melrose/Riverside Hilton
Date: Tuesday, July 30th, 2013
Time: 3:45 PM
Number: 34009
Abstract ID:174
Candidate for Awards:None


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