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Abstract Detail



Mycological Section

Martinez, Domonique [1], Trebelcock, William [1], Roehrs, Zachary [1], Wangeline, Ami [1].

Elucidating tolerance: selenium’s effect on lipid peroxidation and glutathione peroxidase in rhizospheric fungi.

Selenium (Se) is a trace element that occurs both naturally and anthropogenically and is essential for many organisms, including animals and bacteria, but not for plants or fungi. Se is typically antifungal, but some fungi isolated from plants that accumulate Se (up to 20,000 ppm) seem to thrive in their Se rich environments. These Se tolerant fungi were isolated from the roots of Se accumulator plants and examined to begin elucidation of possible Se tolerance mechanisms. First, cellular stress as a measure of lipid peroxidation (LPO) was examined to determine if Se tolerance was due to stress response, or was the result of other physiological mechanisms. Further, due to differences in the composition of the enzyme glutathione peroxidase (GPx) between animals (uses Se) and fungi (uses S), GPx activity was evaluated in relationship to differing levels of Se in fungal isolates. Impacts on GPx activity and LPO levels varied between isolates and Se treatments, but most indicated a physiological response, either positive or negative. For example, in the presence of selenite, isolates of Aspergillus leporis exhibited a trend of reduced LPO, while selenate resulted in increasing cellular stress ultimately triggering a stress response.

Broader Impacts:


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1 - Laramie County Community College, Biology, 1400 E. College Drive, Cheyenne, WY, 82007, USA

Keywords:
Selenium
Filamentous fungi
Alternaria
Aspergillus
Glutathione peroxidase
Lipid peroxidation.

Presentation Type: Poster:Posters for Sections
Session: P
Location: Grand Salon A - D/Riverside Hilton
Date: Monday, July 29th, 2013
Time: 5:30 PM
Number: PMY003
Abstract ID:875
Candidate for Awards:None


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